Recent Acquisitions

Edison Mimeograph Machine

Edison Mimeograph Machine

In 1884, Albert B. Dick of Chicago invented a duplicating machine called a mimeograph. The  A. B. Dick Co. acquired Thomas Edison’s copying system patents and began working with him to manufacture and market a mimeograph system.  The early Edison-Dick mimeograph technology for handwritten documents was packaged in a box with an ink roller, special waxed writing paper, blotters, ink, a writing stylus, and a frame to hold the stencil taut while it was being inked.  A.B. Dick claimed that one handwritten stencil could make 3,000 copies.

Edison Mimeograph Machine

This Edison Mimeograph Machine No. 61, from 1900, was donated to the museum by David Gallivan of Kalamazoo The donor didn't use the machine but displayed it in his business office, D.L. Gallivan, Inc.