School Shows

One World, One Sky

One World, One Sky

Title graphic from the planetarium show One World, One Sky featuring Big Bird and Elmo.

Big Bird starts us off by directing our attention to the daytime sky above, including the Sun, which is actually a star. The Sun is big and bright because it is the star closest to us. Stars are just like our sun, but shining farther away. Following the sunset, kids can use their imagination to make shapes by connecting the stars they see. While stargazing, Big Bird points out the Big Dipper, a popular constellation in the night sky. Elmo joins us and introduces his friend from China, Hu Hu Zhu, who tells us about the beautiful countryside and cities where he is from. Hu Hu Zhu teaches us how to say “hi,” “Big Dipper,” “moon,” and even sing “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” in Chinese. The North Star is his favorite star, and he helps us to find it using the Big Dipper.

As they notice the shape of the Moon in the sky, our Sesame Street friends remember the different stories that talk about it. Without a space ship, however, Elmo and Hu Hu Zhu need our help imagining what it would be like to go to the Moon. Once there, they discover that being on the Moon is different from being on Earth. There is no air on the Moon, so they need space helmets to breathe, and since air is required for wind, a kite will not fly on the Moon. The Moon has less gravity than the Earth, so people can jump much higher and kick a ball farther than normal. While on the Moon, they see the Earth as if it were a moon in the sky, and the stars look the same as they do from China or from home.

The sunrise brings a new day and ends the night, as the stars disappear again.


One World, One Sky
on YouTube.